Criminal Sexual Conduct Part 1: Crimes that will land you on the Sex Offender Registry in Minnesota

Sex Crimes in Minnesota

Over the last few months, we have seen an influx of questions about the offenses, penalties and potential ramifications of being convicted of a sex crime in Minnesota.  We decided to conduct a three-part series to answer some of the most common questions surrounding criminal sexual conduct.  In Part 1, we explain what type of crimes will require you to register as a sex offender in Minnesota.  In future posts, we’ll explain “How to Register as a Sex Offender in Minnesota”, and “The Penalties for Failing to Register as a Sex Offender”.

According to Minnesota law, any person convicted of specific sexual offense is required to register on the offender list.  In Minnesota, this list is known as the “Predatory Offender Registration”, and a person is required to keep their registration current for a minimum of 10 years.  Depending on the offense, a person may be required to say on the list for the rest of their life.

In order to be required to register as a predatory offender in Minnesota, a person must commit one of the following offenses:

  • Criminal sexual conduct in the first, second, third, fourth or fifth degrees.  Specific offenses include unlawful penetration, contact, conduct, or lewd behavior.
  • Felony indecent exposure.
  • Criminal sexual predatory conduct.
  • Soliciting a minor to engage in sexual conduct or prostitution.
  • Possession, production or distribution of child pornography.  This also includes transferring pornographic images to minors.
  • Murder while committing or attempting to commit criminal sexual conduct in the first or second degree with force or violence.
  • Kidnapping.
  • Using a minor in a sexual performance.

A person convicted of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than 30 years or a fine of up to $40,000, or both.  The majority of people who are convicted of a predatory crime will serve at least some time in jail.  Upon their release, they are required to register as a predatory offender with the state.  They may also face certain restrictions like mandatory curfews or the inability to live within a certain distance of a school, park, or daycare.

Predatory offenses are some of the most serious crimes a person can commit.  There is a general social stigma about sexual offenses because oftentimes the perpetrator occupies a position of trust in the eyes of the victim.  While this is not true in all cases, it is not uncommon to hear about these crimes being committed by close friends or family members of the victim.

In Part 2, we’ll explain the process for registering as a sex offender in Minnesota.  We’ll also talk about what happens when a Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 Predatory Offender is released from prison.

The following two tabs change content below.
Avery Appelman is a criminal defense lawyer and the founder of Appelman Law Firm. While his practice is primarily recognized for its work with DWI and related offenses, he has 16 years of experience working with clients on drug, assault, theft, traffic, criminal sexual conduct, and prostitution charges.
Loading Facebook Comments ...

3 thoughts on “Criminal Sexual Conduct Part 1: Crimes that will land you on the Sex Offender Registry in Minnesota”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>